Tickets


TOM HENDRY WAREHOUSE 2016/17 PLAYBILL


MY NAME IS ASHER LEV
BY AARON POSNER
ADAPTED FROM THE NOVEL BY CHAIM POTOK
A CO-PRODUCTION WITH MONTREAL’S SEGAL CENTRE

October 13 – 29, 2016 | Preview October 12
 
“One of the best shows of the year”The Huffington Post
 
For as long as he can remember, Asher Lev wanted to draw -- needed to draw. Every surface was a canvas for his mystifying gift. Asher’s family life is steeped in tradition and his passion for art soon conflicts with his beliefs and culture. When a mentor dares him to find his voice, Asher’s art threatens his relationship with his family and his community. My Name is Asher Lev paints a fascinating picture of the price we must sometimes pay to fulfill our destiny.
 

23.5 HOURS
BY CAREY CRIM

November 17 – December 3, 2016 | Preview November 16
 
“…a thoughtful, layered exploration”Los Angeles Times
 
Once a beloved high school teacher, Tom’s reputation is destroyed after he’s accused of a crime. Though he vehemently proclaims his innocence, a jury disagrees, leaving his wife and family to fend for themselves in a community divided over Tom’s actions. His homecoming reopens old wounds that test friendships, loyalty and personal convictions in this edgy examination of the truths we’re prepared to accept from the people we love.
 

HAND TO GOD
BY ROBERT ASKINS

January 26 – February 11, 2017 | Preview January 25
 
“Flat out hilarious” – The New York Times
 
Who needs the devil on your shoulder when you have a holy terror on your left hand? As one of the malcontent teens in his mom’s Christian puppet ministry, Jason tries to be a good son. But his foul-mouthed sock puppet, Tyrone, has other ideas. As Tyrone gets increasingly aggressive, Jason finds himself in a battle for his soul. Provocative, raunchy and side-splitting, Hand to God is not to be missed by saints and sinners alike.
 

KILL ME NOW
BY BRAD FRASER
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CANADA'S NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE

March 30 – April 15, 2017 | Preview March 29
 
“Moving, deeply emotional, and ultimately harrowing” Stage Review
 
Widower Jake has been unwavering in his care and commitment to his disabled son Joey. As Joey enters adolescence, Jake finds himself in a morally ambiguous position when it comes to charting Joey’s passage from a puberty-ravaged teenager to a self-assured young man. But when he develops a debilitating condition of his own, Jake turns from dependable to dependent and is forced to consider what the future holds for them both. Playwright Brad Fraser finds a darkly comedic way to raise controversial questions about sexuality, compassion and our own mortality.